The Art of Peruvian Specialty Coffee

 

Australian’s associate Peru with vivid images of Machu Picchu, the Andes, colourful people, food and culture. Specialty Peruvian coffee, whilst perhaps not the first thought that comes into mind when us Aussie’s think of Peru, is on the rise and should be on the radar.

 

With over 28 microclimates Peru has a unique geographical context that lends to the variety of blends originating from the country. Melanie Boehme, a German journalist who was part of a press tour run by the Exports and Tourism Promotion Board of Peru (PROMPERU) published a blog titled, “Peruvian adventures. My amazing trip to coffee origin in the wild land of Peru”,  which sheds light on the nature through which the climate impacts the coffee trees and the “little red fruits, the coffee cherries.”

 

The coffee industry’s greatest asset is the Andes mountain range, which links the northern, central and southern coffee producing areas. The coffee that has been selected for Peru’s stand at this year’s expo comes from the Southeastern parts of Cusco and Puno. Each producer has a unique story and product offering. Some of the producers include:

 

Wilson Sucaticona produces coffee in the town of Tunkimayo. Wilson has dedicated most of his life to producing quality coffee and was awarded 2010 winner of cupping at the Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) Achievement Awards. He was also awarded a gold medal in 2016 at the The Agency for the Valorization of Agricultural Product Awards in Paris. His blends are known for their caramelised chocolate aroma and flavour.

 

Deep within the Peruvian jungle of Puno, Raúl Mamani continues his family craft of producing quality coffee. Raúl won the SCAA small producer cupping award in 2017. His blends are known for fragant bursts of raspberries, strawberries and chocolate.

 

This year’s coffee experience will be complimented by Peruvian chocolate tasting. Peruvian cacao most definitely qualifies as a super food, with richness in flavour and unique artisanal attributes.

 

There are three main varieties of Peruvian cacao. The sought after cacao “Blanco” is grown in the fertile valleys of Alto Piura and is best known for citrus and fruity tones. Cacao “Chuncho” is grown in Quillabamba and offers an intense and nutty flavour. “Amazonian Cacao beans” from Tarapoto are considered to be treasures of the Amazon and are bursting with fruity flavours.

 

We have selected premium chocolate brands such as Cacaosuyo for this year’s event. Cacaosuyo recently won gold at the International Chocolate Awards.

 

In addition, Marana produces chocolate from three key regions in Peru, Cusco, Piura and San Martin. Marana was born out of an initiative to move farmers away from coca leaf production and onto cacao. Through positive social change Marana’s producers are also leading change in the world of chocolate.

 Drop by stand #271 to try a variety of delicious blends accompanied with artisanal Peruvian chocolate!

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